Roman chamomile, a plant with many virtues

In phytotherapy, Roman chamomile is best known for its sedative and soothing action, but it also calms intestinal pain thanks to its anti-inflammatory properties. Light on its benefits.
Roman chamomile, a plant with multiple virtues
In phytotherapy, Roman chamomile is best known for its sedative and soothing action, but it also calms intestinal pain thanks to its anti-inflammatory properties. Light on its benefits.

Roman chamomile, a plant with multiple virtues© Adobe Stock / Elenathewise
Summary

What are the benefits of Roman chamomile?

How can Roman chamomile be used in phytotherapy?
The advice of the phytotherapist
What precautions / contraindications?
Roman chamomile, most often called “chamomile”, can be used in phytotherapy, cooking or cosmetics. It differs from German chamomile (small chamomile) and feverfew.

Latin name: Chamaemelum nobile

Family: Asteraceae

Origin of Roman chamomile: Europe, North Africa

Part(s) of Roman chamomile harvested: the base on which the flower (called capitula in botanical terms) rests, still fresh and green to be effective.

Description: Roman camomile, also called noble camomile, is a herbaceous plant of the same family as the daisy. It measures between 10 and 30 cm high and is recognizable by its white flowers. It flowers from July to September.

What are the benefits of Roman chamomile?

Roman chamomile contains flavonoids with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. It is particularly indicated for heartburn, indigestion, nausea and vomiting, flatulence, spasms and constipation.

Thanks to the presence of apigenin in its composition, chamomile also relieves pain during menstruation (dysmenorrhea) by increasing the fluidity of the blood.

Chamomile owes its fame mainly to its role on the central nervous system. Indeed, thanks to its richness in esters and isobutyl angelate, it has a sedative and antidepressant role.

How to use Roman chamomile in phytotherapy?

Chamomile-based phytotherapy products come in the form of whole plant mother tincture, fluid extract, dry extract and essential oil of flowerheads.

It can be used as massage oil, infusion, herbal tea, or even diluted in the bath to help you relax.

The advice of the phytotherapist
If you suffer from digestive problems (indigestion, nausea, heartburn, etc.), painful periods or anxiety, you can take an infusion of Roman chamomile.

Count from 5 to 10 flowerheads for a cup of boiling water. Leave to infuse for ten minutes and drink one cup before each meal. If there is no improvement within three weeks, consult a doctor.

What precautions / contraindications ?

Like several plants from the Asteraceae family, chamomile presents an allergy risk for people who are sensitive to pollens. Pregnant women and asthmatics should also avoid consuming it in the form of essential oil.

In case of overdose, Roman chamomile can also cause dizziness, nausea or vomiting.

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